Effects of method of straw disposal and depth of cultivation on populations of Fusarium spp. in soil and on brown foot rot in continuous winter wheat

A - Papers appearing in refereed journals

Bateman, G. L., Murray, G., Gutteridge, R. J. and Coskun, H. 1998. Effects of method of straw disposal and depth of cultivation on populations of Fusarium spp. in soil and on brown foot rot in continuous winter wheat. Annals of Applied Biology. 132 (1), pp. 35-47.

AuthorsBateman, G. L., Murray, G., Gutteridge, R. J. and Coskun, H.
Abstract

Soil samples (0-10 cm depth) taken from plots of continuous winter wheat at intervals between January 1993 and July 1996 were dilution-plated on PCNB agar to identify and enumerate colony-forming units (cfus) of Fusarium spp. Cfus of the main wheat pathogen, F, culmorum, were more numerous in soil from plots that were shallow-cultivated to 10 cm after each harvest than in those that were ploughed. They were also usually more numerous in plots in which straw had been chopped and incorporated (by shallow cultivation or ploughing) than in those in which straw had been burnt. Increasing amounts of straw tended to increase the number of cfus. Deeper sampling (15-25 cm) showed that ploughing resulted in a more even, but diluted, distribution of cfus down the soil profile. Populations of some commonly found species that are not pathogenic on wheat (F. oxysporum, F. equiseti, F. flocciferum and F. merismoides) were sometimes also affected by straw disposal or cultivation treatments. Alternative methods of estimating population densities (baiting soil with wheat kernels or wheat seedlings, or plating-out straw fragments) showed generally similar effects of treatments on populations of F. culmorum; the relative merits of the methods are considered. Large differences in population densities of all species occurred within and between seasons. The smallest populations were found in January 1995 but, in the case of F. culmorum, they increased to relatively large numbers in July 1995. The summer of 1995 was warm and dry and especially favourable for development of fusarium foot rot. Severe disease occurred only in this year and was less frequent after ploughing than after tine-cultivation but more frequent after straw burning than after straw incorporation. The implications of these observations for understanding the role of propagules of F. culmorum in soil as inoculum for foot rot are discussed.

KeywordsAgriculture, Multidisciplinary
Year of Publication1998
JournalAnnals of Applied Biology
Journal citation132 (1), pp. 35-47
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1111/j.1744-7348.1998.tb05183.x
Open accessPublished as non-open access
Funder project or code204
423
ISSN00034746
PublisherWiley

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