Development of Oculimacula yallundae and O. acuformis (eyespot) on leaf sheaths of winter wheat in the UK in relation to thermal time

A - Papers appearing in refereed journals

Wan, A. M., Bock, C. H., Fitt, B. D. L., Harvey, J. L. and Jenkyn, J. F. 2005. Development of Oculimacula yallundae and O. acuformis (eyespot) on leaf sheaths of winter wheat in the UK in relation to thermal time. Plant Pathology. 54 (2), pp. 144-155.

AuthorsWan, A. M., Bock, C. H., Fitt, B. D. L., Harvey, J. L. and Jenkyn, J. F.
Abstract

In a controlled environment (15/10 degrees C) (day/night) container experiment on winter wheat (cv. Avalon), eyespot incidence (percentage of plants affected) and number of leaf sheaths penetrated after 6 weeks increased with inoculum concentration (10(2)-10(6) conidia mL(-1)) of Oculimacula yallundae (OY) or Oculimacula acuformis (OA), but there was no difference between the two species. In an outdoor container experiment, seedlings inoculated with OY 2 weeks after sowing had a greater incidence of eyespot than those inoculated with OA, when assessed 7 weeks after inoculation. Seedlings inoculated with OA at 10 or 20 weeks after sowing developed more severe eyespot by maturity than those inoculated with OY. In an experiment at 15/10 degrees C with seedlings inoculated with OY + OA 2 weeks after sowing, more leaf sheaths were penetrated by OY (3.0 per plant) than OA (2.3 per plant) 6 weeks after inoculation. Field experiments with winter wheat consistently showed leaf sheath production, leaf sheath death, and number of leaf sheaths infected or penetrated by OA or OY were related linearly to thermal time (degrees C days) after sowing. Depending on cultivar, season and sample, a new leaf sheath was produced in 116-216 degrees C days; a leaf sheath died in 221-350 degrees C days; and infection of a new leaf sheath occurred in 129-389 degrees C days. The mean number of living leaf sheaths infected differed between samples, cultivars and seasons for both OY and OA. Regression analysis of the 1985/86 data suggested that OY progressed more rapidly than OA through the leaf sheaths, and that both the pathogens progressed more rapidly than the rate of leaf sheath death, but more slowly than the rate at which leaf sheaths were produced. It also suggested that OA progressed more slowly than the rate at which leaf sheaths died in 1987/88, but OY did not.

KeywordsAgronomy; Plant Sciences
Year of Publication2005
JournalPlant Pathology
Journal citation54 (2), pp. 144-155
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1111/j.1365-3059.2005.01165.x
Open accessPublished as non-open access
Funder project or code507
ISSN00320862
PublisherWiley

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