Effects of different cultivated or weed grasses, grown as pure stands or in combination with wheat, on take-all and its suppression in subsequent wheat crops

A - Papers appearing in refereed journals

Gutteridge, R. J., Jenkyn, J. F. and Bateman, G. L. 2006. Effects of different cultivated or weed grasses, grown as pure stands or in combination with wheat, on take-all and its suppression in subsequent wheat crops. Plant Pathology. 55 (5), pp. 696-704.

AuthorsGutteridge, R. J., Jenkyn, J. F. and Bateman, G. L.
Abstract

Grass species were grown in plots, as pure stands or mixed with wheat, after a sequence of wheat crops in which take-all (Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici) had developed. Annual brome grasses maintained take-all inoculum in the soil as well as wheat (grown as a continuous sequence), and much better than cultivated species with a perennial habit. Take-all developed more in wheat grown after Anisantha sterilis (barren brome) or Bromus secalinus (rye brome), with or without wheat, than in continuous grass-free wheat in the same year, where take-all decline was apparently occurring. It was equally or more severe, however, in wheat grown after Lolium perenne (rye-grass) or Festuca arundinacea (tall fescue), despite these species having left the least inoculum in the soil. It was most severe in plots where these two grasses had been grown as mixtures with wheat. It is postulated that the presence of these grasses inhibited the development of take-all-suppressive microbiota that had developed in the grass-free wheat crops. The effects of the grasses appeared to be temporary, as amounts of take-all in a second subsequent winter wheat test crop were similar after all treatments. These results have important implications for take-all risk in wheat and, perhaps, other cereal crops grown after grass weed-infested cereals or after set-aside or similar 1-year covers containing weeds or sown grasses, especially in combination with cereal volunteers. They also indicate that grasses might be used experimentally in wheat crop sequences for investigating the mechanisms of suppression of, and conduciveness to, take-all.

KeywordsAgronomy; Plant Sciences
Year of Publication2006
JournalPlant Pathology
Journal citation55 (5), pp. 696-704
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1111/j.1365-3059.2006.01405.x
Open accessPublished as non-open access
Funder project or code506
ISSN00320862
PublisherWiley

Permalink - https://repository.rothamsted.ac.uk/item/89q60/effects-of-different-cultivated-or-weed-grasses-grown-as-pure-stands-or-in-combination-with-wheat-on-take-all-and-its-suppression-in-subsequent-wheat-crops

1 total views
0 total downloads
0 views this month
0 downloads this month