Moth biomass increases and decreases over 50 years in Britain

A - Papers appearing in refereed journals

Macgregor, C. J., Williams, J. H., Bell, J. R. and Thomas, C. D. 2019. Moth biomass increases and decreases over 50 years in Britain. Nature Ecology & Evolution.

AuthorsMacgregor, C. J., Williams, J. H., Bell, J. R. and Thomas, C. D.
Abstract

Steep insect biomass declines ('insectageddon') have been widely reported, despite a lack of continuously collected biomass data from replicated long-term monitoring sites. Such severe declines are not supported by the world’s longest running insect population database: annual moth biomass estimates from British fixed monitoring sites revealed increasing biomass between 1967 and 1982, followed by gradual decline from 1982 to 2017, with a 2.2-fold net gain in mean biomass between the first (1967–1976) and last decades (2008–2017) of monitoring. High between-year variability and multi-year periodicity in biomass emphasize the need for long-term data to detect trends and identify their causes robustly.

Year of Publication2019
JournalNature Ecology & Evolution
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1038/s41559-019-1028-6
Web address (URL)https://t.co/L7IHNEZMyG
Open accessPublished as green open access
FunderBBSRC Industrial Strategy Challenge
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council
Funder project or codeBBSRC Strategic Programme in Smart Crop Protection
The Rothamsted Insect Survey - National Capability [2017-2022]
Supplemental file
Output statusPublished
Publication dates
Online11 Nov 2019
Publication process dates
Accepted04 Oct 2019
PublisherNature Publishing Group
ISSN2397-334X

Permalink - https://repository.rothamsted.ac.uk/item/96yx7/moth-biomass-increases-and-decreases-over-50-years-in-britain

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Under embargo until 11 May 2020

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