Population genetic structure and predominance of cyclical parthenogenesis in the bird cherry–oat aphid Rhopalosiphum padi in England

A - Papers appearing in refereed journals

Morales-Hojas, R., Gonzalez-Uriarte, A., Alvira-Iraizoz, F., Jenkins, T., Alderson, L. J., Kruger, T., Hall, M. J., Greenslade, A. F. C., Shortall, C. R. and Bell, J. R. 2020. Population genetic structure and predominance of cyclical parthenogenesis in the bird cherry–oat aphid Rhopalosiphum padi in England. Evolutionary Applications.

AuthorsMorales-Hojas, R., Gonzalez-Uriarte, A., Alvira-Iraizoz, F., Jenkins, T., Alderson, L. J., Kruger, T., Hall, M. J., Greenslade, A. F. C., Shortall, C. R. and Bell, J. R.
Abstract

Genetic diversity is determinant for pest species' success and vector competence. Understanding the ecological and evolutionary processes that determine the genetic diversity is fundamental to help identify the spatial scale at which pest populations are best managed. In the present study, we present the first comprehensive analysis of the genetic diversity and evolution of Rhopalosiphum padi, a major pest of cereals and a main vector of the barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV), in England. We have used a genotyping by sequencing approach to study whether i) there is any underlying population genetic structure at a national and regional scale in this pest that can disperse long distances; ii) the populations evolve as a response to environmental change and selective pressures, and; iii) the populations comprise anholocyclic lineages. Individual R. padi were collected using the Rothamsted Insect Survey's suction‐trap network at several sites across England between 2004 and 2016 as part of the RIS long‐term nationwide surveillance. Results identified two genetic clusters in England that mostly corresponded to a North – South division, although gene flow is ongoing between the two subpopulations. These genetic clusters do not correspond to different life cycles types, and cyclical parthenogenesis is predominant in England. Results also show that there is dispersal with gene flow across England, although there is a reduction between the northern and southern sites with the Southwestern population being the most genetically differentiated. There is no evidence for isolation‐by‐distance and other factors like primary host distribution, uncommon in the south and absent in the southwest, could influence the dispersal patterns. Finally, results also show no evidence for the evolution of the R. padi population, and it is demographically stable despite the ongoing environmental change. These results are discussed in view of their relevance to pest management and the transmission of BYDV.

KeywordsArchive insect samples; DNA extraction; Genomics; Temporal data analysis; Aphids; BYDV
Year of Publication2020
JournalEvolutionary Applications
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1111/eva.12917
Web address (URL)https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/eva.12917
Open accessPublished as green open access
FunderBiotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council
Funder project or codeBBSRC Strategic Programme in Smart Crop Protection
The Rothamsted Insect Survey - National Capability [2017-2022]
Publisher's version
Output statusPublished
Publication dates
Online19 Jan 2020
PublisherWiley
ISSN1752-4571

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