Soil CO2 emissions in cropland with fodder maize (Zea mays L.) with and without riparian buffer strips of differing vegetation

A - Papers appearing in refereed journals

Dlamini, J., Cardenas, L. M., Tesfamariam, E.H., Dunn, R. M., Hawkins, J. M. B., Blackwell, M. S. A. and Collins, A. L. 2022. Soil CO2 emissions in cropland with fodder maize (Zea mays L.) with and without riparian buffer strips of differing vegetation. Agroforestry Systems. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10457-022-00756-5

AuthorsDlamini, J., Cardenas, L. M., Tesfamariam, E.H., Dunn, R. M., Hawkins, J. M. B., Blackwell, M. S. A. and Collins, A. L.
Abstract

Vegetated land areas play a significant role in determining the fate of carbon (C) in the global C cycle. Riparian buffer vegetation is primarily implemented for water quality purposes as they attenuate pollutants from immediately adjacent croplands before reaching freshwater systems. However, their prevailing conditions may sometimes promote the production and subsequent emissions of soil carbon dioxide (CO2). Despite this, the understanding of soil CO2 emissions from riparian buffer vegetation and a direct comparison with adjacent croplands they serve remain elusive. In order to quantify the extent of CO2 emissions in such an agro system, we measured CO2 emissions simultaneously with soil and environmental variables for six months in a replicated plot-scale facility comprising of maize cropping served by three vegetated riparian buffers, namely: (i) a novel grass riparian buffer; (ii) a willow riparian buffer, and; (iii) a woodland riparian buffer. These buffered treatments were compared with a no-buffer control. The woodland (322.9 ± 3.1 kg ha− 1) and grass (285 ± 2.7 kg ha− 1) riparian buffer treatments (not significant to each other) generated significantly (p = < 0.0001) the largest CO2 compared to the remainder of the treatments. Our results suggest that during maize production in general, the woodland and grass riparian buffers serving a maize crop pose a CO2 threat. The results of the current study point to the need to consider the benefits for gaseous emissions of mitigation measures conventionally implemented for improving the sustainability of water resources.

KeywordsFreshwater courses; Arable land; Carbon dynamics; Mineralisation
Year of Publication2022
JournalAgroforestry Systems
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1007/s10457-022-00756-5
Web address (URL)https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10457-022-00756-5#rightslink
Open accessPublished as ‘gold’ (paid) open access
FunderBiotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council
The British Council
Funder project or codeNational Research Foundation-Thuthuka. Grant Number: 117964
Impacts of different vegetation in riparian buffer strips on hydrology and water quality
Researcher Links Travel Grant
S2N - Soil to Nutrition - Work package 2 (WP2) - Adaptive management systems for improved efficiency and nutritional quality
S2N - Soil to Nutrition - Work package 3 (WP3) - Sustainable intensification - optimisation at multiple scales
Publisher's version
Output statusPublished
Publication dates
Online22 Jul 2022
Publication process dates
Accepted08 Jul 2022
PublisherSpringer
ISSN0167-4366

Permalink - https://repository.rothamsted.ac.uk/item/98971/soil-co2-emissions-in-cropland-with-fodder-maize-zea-mays-l-with-and-without-riparian-buffer-strips-of-differing-vegetation

15 total views
0 total downloads
3 views this month
0 downloads this month
Download files as zip