Phytoextraction efficiency of Arabidopsis halleri is driven by the plant and not by soil metal concentration

A - Papers appearing in refereed journals

Dietrich, C. C., Tandy, S., Murawska-Wlodarczyk, K., Banas, A., Korzeniak., U., Seget, B. and Babst-Kostecka, A. 2021. Phytoextraction efficiency of Arabidopsis halleri is driven by the plant and not by soil metal concentration. Chemosphere. 285 (Dec 2021), p. 131437. https://doi.org/0.1016/j.chemosphere.2021.131437

AuthorsDietrich, C. C., Tandy, S., Murawska-Wlodarczyk, K., Banas, A., Korzeniak., U., Seget, B. and Babst-Kostecka, A.
Abstract

The hyperaccumulation trait allows some plant species to allocate remarkable amounts of trace metal elements
(TME) to their foliage without suffering from toxicity. Utilizing hyperaccumulating plants to remediate TME
contaminated sites could provide a sustainable alternative to industrial approaches. A major hurdle that currently hampers this approach is the complexity of the plant-soil relationship. To better anticipate the outcome of future phytoremediation efforts, we evaluated the potential for soil metal-bioavailability to predict TME accumulation in two non-metallicolous and two metallicolous populations of the Zn/Cd hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri. We also examined the relationship between a population’s habitat and its phytoextraction efficiency. Total Zn and Cd concentrations were quantified in soil and plant material, and bioavailable fractions in soil were quantified via Diffusive Gradients in Thin-films (DGT). We found that shoot TME accumulation
varied independent from both total and bioavailable soil TME concentrations in metallicolous individuals. In fact, hyperaccumulation patterns appear more plant- and less soil-driven: one non-metallicolous population proved to be as efficient in accumulating Zn on non-polluted soil as the metallicolous populations in their highly contaminated environment. Our findings demonstrate that in-situ information on plant phytoextraction efficiency is indispensable to optimize site-specific phytoremediation measures. If successful, hyperaccumulating plant biomass may provide valuable source material for application in the emerging field of green chemistry.

KeywordsArabidopsis halleri; DGT; Hyperaccumulation; Phytoextraction efficiency; Trace metal elements; Pseudometallophyte
Year of Publication2021
JournalChemosphere
Journal citation285 (Dec 2021), p. 131437
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/0.1016/j.chemosphere.2021.131437
Open accessPublished as non-open access
FunderBiotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council
Funder project or codeS2N - Soil to Nutrition [ISPG]
Output statusPublished
Publication dates
Online05 Jul 2021
Publication process dates
Accepted02 Jul 2021
PublisherElsevier
ISSN0045-6535

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