Urban malaria may be spreading via the wind—here’s why that’s important.

A - Papers appearing in refereed journals

Lehmann, T., Bamou, R., Chapman, J. W., Reynolds, D. R., Armbruster, P. A., Dao, A., Yaro, A. S., Burkot, T. R. and Linton,Y.-M. 2023. Urban malaria may be spreading via the wind—here’s why that’s important. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 120 (18), p. e2301666120. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2301666120

AuthorsLehmann, T., Bamou, R., Chapman, J. W., Reynolds, D. R., Armbruster, P. A., Dao, A., Yaro, A. S., Burkot, T. R. and Linton,Y.-M.
Abstract

Until now, malaria in Africa has been primarily a rural problem. But the recent establishment and expansion of the invasive urban Asian vector Anopheles stephensi will likely drastically change Africa’s risk landscape.

KeywordsMosquito; Anopheles stephensi; Windborne migration; Vector control strategies
Year of Publication2023
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Journal citation120 (18), p. e2301666120
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2301666120
Open accessPublished as bronze (free) open access
FunderBiotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council
Output statusPublished
Publication dates
Online27 Apr 2023
Publication process dates
Accepted07 Mar 2023
PublisherNational Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
ISSN0027-8424

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