Modeling the Simultaneous Evolution of Resistance to ALS- and ACCase-Inhibiting Herbicides in Barnyardgrass (Echinochloa crus-galli) in Clearfield (R) Rice

A - Papers appearing in refereed journals

Bagavathiannan, M. V., Norsworthy, J. K., Smith, K. L. and Neve, P. 2014. Modeling the Simultaneous Evolution of Resistance to ALS- and ACCase-Inhibiting Herbicides in Barnyardgrass (Echinochloa crus-galli) in Clearfield (R) Rice. Weed Technology. 28 (1), pp. 89-103.

AuthorsBagavathiannan, M. V., Norsworthy, J. K., Smith, K. L. and Neve, P.
Abstract

Herbicide-resistant barnyardgrass has become widespread in the rice production systems of the midsouthern United States, leaving few effective herbicide options for controlling this weed. The acetolactate synthase (ALS)- and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase)-inhibiting herbicides remain largely effective in Clearfield(R) rice production, but strategies need to be developed to protect the long-term utility of these options. A two-trait model was developed to understand simultaneous evolution of resistance in barnyardgrass to the ALS- and ACCase-inhibiting herbicides in Clearfield rice. The model was used to predict resistance under a number of common weed management scenarios across 1,000 hypothetical rice fields in the Mississippi Delta region and answer some key management questions. Under an ALS inhibitor-only program consisting of three annual applications of imidazolinone herbicides (imazethapyr or imazamox) in continuous Clearfield rice, resistance was predicted within 4 yr with 80% risk by year 30. Weed management programs that consisted of ALS- and ACCase-inhibiting herbicides such as fenoxaprop and cyhalofop greatly reduced the risk of ALS-inhibiting herbicide resistance (12% risk by year 30), but there was a considerable risk for ACCase resistance (evolving by year 14 with 13% risk by year 30) and multiple resistance (evolving by year 16 with 11% risk by year 30) to both of these mechanisms of action. A unique insight was that failure to stop using a herbicide soon after resistance evolution can accelerate resistance to the subsequent herbicide option. Further, a strong emphasis on minimizing seedbank size is vital for any successful weed management strategy. Results also demonstrated that diversifying management options is not just adequate, but diversity combined with timely herbicide applications aimed at achieving high efficacy levels possible is imperative.

KeywordsClearfield (R) rice; herbicide resistance management; multiple; Resistance; simulation modeling; Weed population dynamics; lolium-rigidum; oryza-sativa; glyphosate resistance; management-practices; arkansas; Weeds; rates; seed; Germination; Emergence
Year of Publication2014
JournalWeed Technology
Journal citation28 (1), pp. 89-103
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1614/wt-d-13-00106.1
Open accessPublished as non-open access
Output statusPublished
ISSN0890037X
0890-037X
PublisherCambridge University Press (CUP) Cambridge

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