The distribution of viruses in different leaf tissues and its influence on virus transmission by aphids

A - Papers appearing in refereed journals

Bawden, F. C., Hamlyn, B. M. G. and Watson, M. A. 1954. The distribution of viruses in different leaf tissues and its influence on virus transmission by aphids. Annals of Applied Biology - AAB. 41 (2), pp. 229-239. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1744-7348.1954.tb01116.x

AuthorsBawden, F. C., Hamlyn, B. M. G. and Watson, M. A.
Abstract

Exposing both surfaces of leaves systemically infected with cabbage black ring spot virus (CBRSV) or henbane mosaic virus to ultra-violet radiation decreases the infectivity of expressed sap to about one-fifth. As irradiation probably inactivates virus mainly in the epidermis, which occupies about one-quarter the volume of the leaves, these viruses seem to occur at much higher concentrations in sap from the epidermis than in sap from other cells. By contrast, tobacco mosaic virus seems not to occur predominantly in the epidermis. CBRSV and henbane mosaic virus are normally transmitted most frequently by previously fasted aphids that feed for only short periods on infected leaves, but aphids treated like this transmit rarely from leaves that have been exposed to ultraviolet radiation. Irradiation has relatively little effect on the proportion of aphids that transmit after long infection feedings. Fasting seems to increase transmission by increasing the probability that aphids will imbibe sap from the epidermis of leaves they newly colonize. With longer periods on infected leaves, the ability of fasted aphids to transmit probably decreases because they then feed from deeper cells and their stylets contain sap with less virus. Only virus contained in the stylets seems to be transmitted, not virus taken into the stomach. About half the transmissions of henbane mosaic virus by aphids that have colonized tobacco leaves for hours may be caused by insects that temporarily cease feeding on the phloem and newly penetrate the epidermis. Irradiating infected leaves affected the transmission of sugar-beet mosaic virus in the same way as that of henbane mosaic virus, but had little effect on the transmission of beet yellows virus, whose vectors become more likely to transmit the longer they feed on infected plants.

Year of Publication1954
JournalAnnals of Applied Biology - AAB
Journal citation41 (2), pp. 229-239
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1744-7348.1954.tb01116.x
Open accessPublished as non-open access
Output statusPublished
Publication dates
Print01 Jun 1954
Copyright licensePublisher copyright
PublisherWiley
ISSN0003-4746

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