Inoculum potential of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum sclerotia depends on isolate and host plant

A - Papers appearing in refereed journals

Taylor, A., Coventry, E., Handy, C., West, J. S., Young, C. S. and Clarkson, J. P. 2018. Inoculum potential of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum sclerotia depends on isolate and host plant. Plant Pathology. 67 (6), pp. 1286-1295.

AuthorsTaylor, A., Coventry, E., Handy, C., West, J. S., Young, C. S. and Clarkson, J. P.
Abstract

The soil-borne fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum infects many important crop plants. Central to the success of this pathogen is the production of sclerotia, which enables survival in soil and constitutes the primary inoculum. This study aimed to determine how crop plant type and S. sclerotiorum isolate affects sclerotial production and germination and hence inoculum potential. Three S. sclerotiorum isolates (L6, L17, L44) were used to inoculate plants of bean, carrot, lettuce, oilseed rape (OSR) and potato and the number and weight of sclerotia per plant quantified. Carpogenic germination of sclerotia collected from different hosts was also assessed for L6. Production of sclerotia was dependent on both crop plant type and S. sclerotiorum isolate with OSR and lettuce supporting the greatest number (42-122) and weight (1.6-3.0 g) of sclerotia per plant. The largest sclerotia were produced on oilseed rape (33-66 mg). The three S. sclerotiorum isolates exhibited a consistent pattern of sclerotial production irrespective of crop type; L6 produced large numbers of small sclerotia while L44 produced smaller numbers of large sclerotia with L17 intermediate. Germination rate and percentage was greatest for larger sclerotia (4-6.7mm) and also varied between host plants. Combining sclerotial production data and typical field crop densities suggested that infected carrot and OSR could produce the greatest number (3944 m-2) and weight (73 g m-2) of S. sclerotiorum sclerotia respectively, suggesting these crops potentially contribute a greater increase in inoculum. This information, once further validated in field trials, could be used to inform future crop rotation decisions.

Year of Publication2018
JournalPlant Pathology
Journal citation67 (6), pp. 1286-1295
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1111/ppa.12843
PubMed ID10.1111/ppa.12843
Web address (URL)https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/ppa.12843
Open accessPublished as non-open access
FunderDepartment of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Home-Grown Cereals Authority
Scottish Government
Funder project or codeProject: 5108
Sustainable Arable LINK programme
Accepted author manuscript
Output statusE-publication ahead of print
Publication dates
Online08 Mar 2018
Publication process dates
Accepted15 Feb 2018
PublisherWiley-Blackwell
Copyright licenseCC BY
ISSN0032-0862
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