Do Growers Using Solo Fungicides Affect the Durability of Disease Control of Growers Using Mixtures and Alternations? The Case of Spot-Form Net Blotch in Western Australia

A - Papers appearing in refereed journals

Helps, J., Lopez-Ruiz, F., Zerihun, A. and Van Den Bosch, F. 2024. Do Growers Using Solo Fungicides Affect the Durability of Disease Control of Growers Using Mixtures and Alternations? The Case of Spot-Form Net Blotch in Western Australia. Phytopathology. 114 (3), pp. 590-602. https://doi.org/10.1094/PHYTO-02-23-0050-R

AuthorsHelps, J., Lopez-Ruiz, F., Zerihun, A. and Van Den Bosch, F.
Abstract

Growers often use alternations or mixtures of fungicides to slow down the development of resistance to fungicides. However, within a landscape, some growers will implement such resistance management methods, whereas others do not, and may even apply solo components of the resistance management program. We investigated whether growers using solo components of resistant management programs affect the durability of disease control in fields of those who implement fungicide resistance management. We developed a spatially implicit semidiscrete epidemiological model for the development of fungicide resistance. The model simulates the development of epidemics of spot-form net blotch disease, caused by the pathogen Pyrenophora teres f. maculata. The landscape comprises three types of fields, grouped according to their treatment program, with spore dispersal between fields early in the cropping season. In one field type, a fungicide resistance management method is implemented, whereas in the two others, it is not, with one of these field types using a component of the fungicide resistance management program. The output of the model suggests that the use of component fungicides does affect the durability of disease control for growers using resistance management programs. The magnitude of the effect depends on the characteristics of the pathosystem, the degree of inoculum mixing between fields, and the resistance management program being used. Additionally, although increasing the amount of the solo component in the landscape generally decreases the lifespan within which the resistance management program provides effective control, situations exist where the lifespan may be minimized at intermediate levels of the solo component fungicide.

KeywordsAlternations; Spatially implicitsemidiscrete epidemiological model; DMI; Conidia; Ascospores; Fungicide effective life,; Fungicide treatment programs; Gene flow; Hordeum vulgarae; Mixtures; Net blotch; Solo; SDHI; Pyrenophora teresf.maculata
Year of Publication2024
JournalPhytopathology
Journal citation114 (3), pp. 590-602
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1094/PHYTO-02-23-0050-R
Web address (URL)https://apsjournals.apsnet.org/doi/10.1094/PHYTO-02-23-0050-R
Open accessPublished as ‘gold’ (paid) open access
FunderGlobal Challenges Research Fund (UKRI)
BBSRC Industrial Strategy Challenge
Funder project or codeBBSRC Strategic Programme in Smart Crop Protection
Growing Health [ISP]
Growing Health (WP3) - bio-inspired solutions for healthier agroecosystems: Discovery landscapes
Publisher's version
Output statusPublished
Publication dates
Online12 Mar 2024
PublisherAmerican Phytopathological Society (APS)
ISSN0031-949X

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