Greenhouse gas and ammonia emissions from slurry storage: impacts of temperature and potential mitigation through covering (pig slurry) or acidification (cattle slurry)

A - Papers appearing in refereed journals

Misselbrook, T. H., Hunt, J., Perazzolo, F. and Provolo, G. 2016. Greenhouse gas and ammonia emissions from slurry storage: impacts of temperature and potential mitigation through covering (pig slurry) or acidification (cattle slurry). Journal of Environmental Quality. 45 (5), pp. 1520-1530.

AuthorsMisselbrook, T. H., Hunt, J., Perazzolo, F. and Provolo, G.
Abstract

Storage of livestock slurries is a significant source of methane (CH4) and ammonia (NH3) emissions to the atmosphere, for which accurate quantification and potential mitigation methods are required. Methane and NH3 emissions were measured from pilot-scale cattle slurry (CS) and pig slurry (PS) stores under cool, temperate, and warm conditions (approximately 8, 11, and 17°C, respectively) and including two potential mitigation practices: (i) a clay granule floating cover (PS) and (ii) slurry acidification (CS). Cumulative emissions of both gases were influenced by mean temperature over the storage period. Methane emissions from the control treatments over the 2-mo storage periods for the cool, temperate, and warm periods were 0.3, 0.1, and 34.3 g CH4 kg−1 slurry volatile solids for CS and 4.4, 20.1, and 27.7 g CH4 kg−1 slurry volatile solids for PS. Respective NH3 emissions for each period were 4, 7, and 12% of initial slurry N content for CS and 12, 18, and 28% of initial slurry N content for PS. Covering PS with clay granules reduced NH3 emissions by 77% across the three storage periods but had no impact on CH4 emissions. Acidification of CS reduced CH4 and NH3 emissions by 61 and 75%, respectively, across the three storage periods. Nitrous oxide emissions were also monitored but were insignificant. The development of approaches that take into account the influence of storage timing (temperature) and duration on emission estimates for national emission inventory purposes is recommended.

Year of Publication2016
JournalJournal of Environmental Quality
Journal citation45 (5), pp. 1520-1530
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.2134/jeq2015.12.0618
Open accessPublished as ‘gold’ (paid) open access
FunderBiotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council
Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Funder project or codeThe North Wyke Farm Platform [2012-2017]
Publisher's version
Copyright license
CC BY-NC-ND
Output statusPublished
Publication dates
Online16 Sep 2016
Publication process dates
Accepted28 Apr 2016
ISSN0047-2425
PublisherAmerican Society of Agronomy (ASA)

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