Soil temperature and bacterial diversity regulate the impact of irrigation and fertilization practices on ecosystem respiration

A - Papers appearing in refereed journals

Fan, Y. Q., Hao, X. M., Carswell, A. M., Misselbrook, T. H., Ding, R. S., Li, S. and Kang, S. Z. 2021. Soil temperature and bacterial diversity regulate the impact of irrigation and fertilization practices on ecosystem respiration. Agronomy Journal. pp. 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1002/agj2.20613

AuthorsFan, Y. Q., Hao, X. M., Carswell, A. M., Misselbrook, T. H., Ding, R. S., Li, S. and Kang, S. Z.
Abstract

Understanding ecosystem respiration (R-eco) response to various management practices is important for the sustainable development of solar greenhouse systems, which represent a large and profitable industry in Northwest China. A tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.)-cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.)-tomato rotation experiment was conducted with four treatments including two irrigation levels (regular irrigation [RI] and low irrigation [LI]) and two N fertilizer sources (organic-N fertilizer [N1] and inorganic-N fertilizer [N2]). Ecosystem respiration and soil variables were measured multiple times. Mean R-eco flux was 511, 319, and 437 mg m(-2) h(-1) for tomato-2016, cucumber-2016, and tomato-2017, respectively. Soil temperature was the most important factor affecting R-eco magnitude. Tomato seasons with higher temperature had significantly greater R-eco flux than the cucumber season. Organic-N fertilizer application can stimulate R-eco flux, cumulative R-eco, and R-eco intensity mainly by providing favorable soil N and C condition for soil bacterial growth and activity, whereas the difference between irrigation levels was inconsistent. The fitted exponential function describing the relationship between R-eco and soil temperature showed that the temperature sensitivity decreased from tomato-2016 to tomato-2017 for all treatments, corresponding to the continuously reduced soil bacterial alpha diversity. Soil bacterial Shannon index was an effective prediction factor for R-eco in the relatively warmer and drier season, with an R-2 >.8 during tomato-2017. The RIN1 treatment consistently had the greatest cumulative R-eco and the highest soil bacterial alpha diversity throughout the rotation. Further studies are needed on the mechanisms of how the change of soil properties would regulate the response of R-eco to soil abiotic and biotic factors.

Year of Publication2021
JournalAgronomy Journal
Journal citationpp. 1-13
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1002/agj2.20613
Open accessPublished as non-open access
FunderBBSRC Newton funding
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council
Funder project or codeBB/N013468/1
S2N - Soil to Nutrition - Work package 2 (WP2) - Adaptive management systems for improved efficiency and nutritional quality
Output statusPublished
Publication dates
Online27 Jan 2021
Publication process dates
Accepted17 Jan 2021
PublisherAmerican Society of Agronomy (ASA)
ISSN0002-1962

Permalink - https://repository.rothamsted.ac.uk/item/9846v/soil-temperature-and-bacterial-diversity-regulate-the-impact-of-irrigation-and-fertilization-practices-on-ecosystem-respiration

Restricted files

Publisher's version

Under embargo indefinitely

21 total views
0 total downloads
0 views this month
0 downloads this month