Using a multi-scale approach to examine the effects of field margins and landscape features on predatory carabid communities in crop fields

A - Papers appearing in refereed journals

Jowett, K., Milne, A. E., Garrett, D., Blumgart, D., Potts, S. G., Senapathi, D. and Storkey, J. 2024. Using a multi-scale approach to examine the effects of field margins and landscape features on predatory carabid communities in crop fields . Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment. 373 (1 October), p. 109115. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.agee.2024.109115

AuthorsJowett, K., Milne, A. E., Garrett, D., Blumgart, D., Potts, S. G., Senapathi, D. and Storkey, J.
Abstract

Carabid beetles are major predators in agro-ecosystems. The composition of their communities within crop environments governs the pest control services they provide. Field margins and landscape features are known to affect carabid community composition, yet evidence is currently lacking that can be used to support land management decisions targeted at optimising predation services at the farm scale. We used experimental margins across a farm site to test carabid communities in crop areas, margins, and adjacent habitats sampled in the summer. We used novel subterranean trapping with standard pitfall trapping, to distinguish above ground and below ground activity of adults and larvae in different farm habitats. Crop type was the major influence on carabid communities in crop areas. This was followed by landscape influences in terms of adjacent habitat and boundary features, and whilst significant, margin type explained relatively little variance in summer carabid communities in-field. Trap type revealed differential activity by species. Responses to crop type, landscape factors, and margin type also varied by species. Overall, abundances were less in association with margins than control of no margin. Particularly, abundances were lower in the spillover zone adjacent to grass margins, and in the wildflower margins themselves. Carabid larvae showed notably higher abundances in association with an absence of field margins. Measures to boost key carabid species in crop areas should be considered at a farm scale, taking into account potential barrier effects, and potential buffer effects.

KeywordsCarabid; Pest control; Field margin; Spill-over; Landscape effects
Year of Publication2024
JournalAgriculture, Ecosystems & Environment
Journal citation373 (1 October), p. 109115
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1016/j.agee.2024.109115
Web address (URL)https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167880924002330
Open accessPublished as ‘gold’ (paid) open access
FunderBiotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council
Funder project or codeBBSRC Strategic Programme in Smart Crop Protection
S2N - Soil to Nutrition - Work package 3 (WP3) - Sustainable intensification - optimisation at multiple scales
Growing Health [ISP]
Growing Health (WP2) - bio-inspired solutions for healthier agroecosystems: Understanding soil environments
Growing Health (WP3) - bio-inspired solutions for healthier agroecosystems: Discovery landscapes
Publisher's version
Accepted author manuscript
Output statusPublished
Publication dates
Online17 Jun 2024
Publication process dates
Accepted05 Jun 2024
ISSN0167-8809
PublisherElsevier

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