Over 150 years of long-term fertilization alters spatial scaling of microbial biodiversity

A - Papers appearing in refereed journals

Liang, Y., Wu, Liyou, Clark, I. M., Xue, K., Yang, Y., Van Nostrand, J. D., Deng, Y., He, Z., McGrath, S. P., Storkey, J., Hirsch, P. R., Sun, B. and Zhou, J. 2015. Over 150 years of long-term fertilization alters spatial scaling of microbial biodiversity. mBio. 6, pp. e00240-15.

AuthorsLiang, Y., Wu, Liyou, Clark, I. M., Xue, K., Yang, Y., Van Nostrand, J. D., Deng, Y., He, Z., McGrath, S. P., Storkey, J., Hirsch, P. R., Sun, B. and Zhou, J.
Abstract

Spatial scaling is a critical issue in ecology, but how anthropogenic activities like fertilization affect spatial scaling is poorly understood, especially for microbial communities. Here, we determined the effects of long-term fertilization on the spatial scaling of microbial functional diversity and its relationships to plant diversity in the 150-year-old Park Grass Experiment, the oldest continuous grassland experiment in the world. Nested samples were taken from plots with contrasting inorganic fertilization regimes, and community DNAs were analyzed using the GeoChip-based functional gene array. The slopes of microbial gene-area relationships (GARs) and plant species-area relationships (SARs) were estimated in a plot receiving nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) and a control plot without fertilization. Our results indicated that long-term inorganic fertilization significantly increased both microbial GARs and plant SARs. Microbial spatial turnover rates (i.e., z values) were less than 0.1 and were significantly higher in the fertilized plot (0.0583) than in the control plot (0.0449) (P < 0.0001). The z values also varied significantly with different functional genes involved in carbon (C), N, P, and sulfur (S) cycling and with various phylogenetic groups (archaea, bacteria, and fungi). Similarly, the plant SARs increased significantly (P < 0.0001), from 0.225 in the control plot to 0.419 in the fertilized plot. Soil fertilization, plant diversity, and spatial distance had roughly equal contributions in shaping the microbial functional community structure, while soil geochemical variables contributed less. These results indicated that long-term agricultural practice could alter the spatial scaling of microbial biodiversity.

Year of Publication2015
JournalmBio
Journal citation6, pp. e00240-15
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1128/mBio.00240-15
Open accessPublished as ‘gold’ (paid) open access
FunderBiotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council
Funder project or codeDelivering Sustainable Systems (SS) [ISPG]
The Rothamsted Long-Term Experiments including Sample Archive and e-RA database [2012-2017]
Optimisation of nutrients in soil-plant systems: Determining how phosphorus availability is regulated in soils
Optimisation of nutrients in soil-plant systems: How can we control nitrogen cycling in soil?
Publisher's version
Output statusPublished
Publication dates
Online07 Apr 2015
Publication process dates
Accepted04 Mar 2015
PublisherASM
American Society for Microbiology
Copyright licenseCC BY-NC-SA
ISSN2150-7511

Permalink - https://repository.rothamsted.ac.uk/item/8v11v/over-150-years-of-long-term-fertilization-alters-spatial-scaling-of-microbial-biodiversity

11 total views
6 total downloads
2 views this month
0 downloads this month
Download files as zip