Changes in the sulphur status of British wheat grain in the last decade, and its geographical distribution

A - Papers appearing in refereed journals

Zhao, F-J., McGrath, S. P., Crosland, A. R. and Salmon, S. E. 1995. Changes in the sulphur status of British wheat grain in the last decade, and its geographical distribution. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture - jsfa. 68 (4), pp. 507-514.

AuthorsZhao, F-J., McGrath, S. P., Crosland, A. R. and Salmon, S. E.
Abstract

In 1992 and 1993, respectively, 400 and 393 wheat grain samples were collected representatively from the major wheat-growing areas in Britain. Concentrations of S in the grain and the N:S ratios were determined, and the variations due to variety and geographical distribution were analysed. Grain S concentration ranged from 0.54 to 2.09, with a mean of 1.43 mg g(-1) in 1992, and from 0.80 to 1.67, with a mean of 1.26 mg g(-1) in 1993. The ranges of grain N:S ratio were 13.3-29.6, with a mean of 15.8 in 1992, and 11.5-25.9, mean 15.6 in 1993. Breadmaking varieties contained significantly greater N and S concentrations in the grain than other varieties, but only small differences were found in the N:S ratio in grain. In 1992 and 1993, 7 and 26% of the samples had a S concentration below the critical value of 1.2 mg g(-1), respectively, whereas 10 and 7% of the samples had an N:S ratio greater than the critical value of 17. In both years 2.5% of the samples satisfied both criteria of S deficiency. Comparison of the results of 1992-1993 with those of 1981-1982 (Byers et al, J Sci Food Agric 38 (1987) 151-160) showed a significant decrease in the S status of British wheat grain during the 10-12 year period. The decrease can be attributed mainly to decreased S inputs, particularly from atmospheric deposition. The pattern of geographical distribution of grain S concentrations was not as strong as it was in the 1982 survey. However, it was still apparent that grain samples with small S concentrations were located mainly in Scotland, northern England, and the west and southwest of England, whereas the largest S concentrations occurred mainly in the areas near to or down-wind of the industrial conurbations of central England.

KeywordsAgriculture, Multidisciplinary; Chemistry, Applied; Food Science & Technology
Year of Publication1995
JournalJournal of the Science of Food and Agriculture - jsfa
Journal citation68 (4), pp. 507-514
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1002/jsfa.2740680415
Open accessPublished as non-open access
Funder project or code108
914
221
Project: 031343
Project: 031272
ISSN00225142
0022-5142
PublisherWiley

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