Freshwater invertebrate responses to fine sediment stress A multi-continent perspective

A - Papers appearing in refereed journals

McKenzie, M., Brooks, A., Callisto, M., Collins, A. L., Durkota, J. M., Death, R. G., Iwan Jones, J., Linares, M. S., Matthaei, C. D., Monk, W. A., Murphy, J. A., Wagenhoff, A., Wilkes, M., Wood, P. J. and Mathers, K. L. 2023. Freshwater invertebrate responses to fine sediment stress A multi-continent perspective. Global Change Biology. 30 (1), p. e17084. https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.17084

AuthorsMcKenzie, M., Brooks, A., Callisto, M., Collins, A. L., Durkota, J. M., Death, R. G., Iwan Jones, J., Linares, M. S., Matthaei, C. D., Monk, W. A., Murphy, J. A., Wagenhoff, A., Wilkes, M., Wood, P. J. and Mathers, K. L.
Abstract

Excessive fine sediment (particles <2 mm) deposition in freshwater systems is a pervasive stressor worldwide. However, understanding of ecological response to excess fine sediment in river systems at the global scale is limited. Here, we aim to address whether there is a consistent response to increasing levels of deposited fine sediment by freshwater invertebrates across multiple geographic regions (Australia, Brazil, New Zealand and the UK). Results indicate ecological responses are not globally consistent and are instead dependent on both the region and the facet of invertebrate diversity considered, that is, taxonomic or functional trait structure. Invertebrate communities of Australia were most sensitive to deposited fine sediment, with the greatest rate of change in communities occurring when fine sediment cover was low (below 25% of the reach). Communities in the UK displayed a greater tolerance with most compositional change occurring between 30% and 60% cover. In both New Zealand and Brazil, which included the most heavily sedimented sampled streams, the communities were more tolerant or demonstrated ambiguous responses, likely due to historic environmental filtering of invertebrate communities. We conclude that ecological responses to fine sediment are not generalisable globally and are dependent on landscape filters with regional context and historic land management playing important roles.

KeywordsAquatic biodiversity ; Community composition ; Conservation ; Ecological threshold ; Ecosystem function ; Global scale
Year of Publication2023
JournalGlobal Change Biology
Journal citation30 (1), p. e17084
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.17084
Web address (URL)https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/gcb.17084
Open accessPublished as ‘gold’ (paid) open access
FunderBiotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council
Funder project or codeUKRI (UK Research and Innovation) Future Leaders Fellowship MR/T017856/1
Resilient Farming Futures
Publisher's version
Output statusPublished
Publication dates
Online09 Dec 2023
Publication process dates
Accepted10 Nov 2023
PublisherWiley
ISSN1354-1013

Permalink - https://repository.rothamsted.ac.uk/item/98yz8/freshwater-invertebrate-responses-to-fine-sediment-stress-a-multi-continent-perspective

24 total views
3 total downloads
4 views this month
0 downloads this month
Download files as zip