Do NO, N2O, N2 and N2 fluxes differ in soils sourced from cropland and varying riparian buffer vegetation? An incubation study

A - Papers appearing in refereed journals

Dlamini, J. C., Tesfamariam, E. H., Verbeeck, M., Loick, N., Louro-Lopez, A., Hawkins, J. M. B., Blackwell, M. S. A., Dunn, R., Collins, A. L. and Cardenas, L. M. 2023. Do NO, N2O, N2 and N2 fluxes differ in soils sourced from cropland and varying riparian buffer vegetation? An incubation study. Soil Use and Management. 40 (1), p. e12951. https://doi.org/10.1111/sum.12951

AuthorsDlamini, J. C., Tesfamariam, E. H., Verbeeck, M., Loick, N., Louro-Lopez, A., Hawkins, J. M. B., Blackwell, M. S. A., Dunn, R., Collins, A. L. and Cardenas, L. M.
Abstract

Riparian buffers are expedient interventions for water quality functions in agricultural landscapes. However, the choice of vegetation and management affects soil microbial communities, which in turn affect nutrient cycling and the production and emission of gases such as nitric oxide (NO), nitrous oxide (N2O), nitrogen gas (N2) and carbon dioxide (CO2). To investigate the potential fluxes of the above-mentioned gases, soil samples were collected from a cropland and downslope grass, willow and woodland riparian buffers from a replicated plot scale experimental facility. The soils were re-packed into cores and to investigate their potential to produce the aforementioned gases via potential denitrification, a potassium nitrate (KNO3−) and glucose (labile carbon)-containing amendment, was added prior to incubation in a specialized laboratory DENItrification System (DENIS). The resulting NO, N2O, N2 and CO2 emissions were measured simultaneously, with the most NO (2.9 ± 0.31 mg NO m−2) and N2O (1413.4 ± 448.3 mg N2O m−2) generated by the grass riparian buffer and the most N2 (698.1 ± 270.3 mg N2 m−2) and CO2 (27,558.3 ± 128.9 mg CO2 m−2) produced by the willow riparian buffer. Thus, the results show that grass riparian buffer soils have a greater NO3− removal capacity, evidenced by their large potential denitrification rates, while the willow riparian buffers may be an effective riparian buffer as its soils potentially promote complete denitrification to N2, especially in areas with similar conditions to the current study.

KeywordsDenitrification potential ; Gas fluxes ; Greenhouse gas emissions ; Nitrogen cycling ; Riparian buffers
Year of Publication2023
JournalSoil Use and Management
Journal citation40 (1), p. e12951
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1111/sum.12951
Web address (URL)https://bsssjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/sum.12951#pane-pcw-related
Open accessPublished as ‘gold’ (paid) open access
FunderBiotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council
Funder project or codeImpacts of different vegetation in riparian buffer strips on hydrology and water quality
S2N - Soil to Nutrition - Work package 1 (WP1) - Optimising nutrient flows and pools in the soil-plant-biota system
S2N - Soil to Nutrition - Work package 2 (WP2) - Adaptive management systems for improved efficiency and nutritional quality
S2N - Soil to Nutrition - Work package 3 (WP3) - Sustainable intensification - optimisation at multiple scales
The South African Department of Higher Education and Training (New Generation Gap of Academics Program)
Publisher's version
Output statusPublished
Publication dates
Online26 Jul 2023
Publication process dates
Accepted22 Jul 2023
PublisherBritish Society of Soil Science (BSSS)
ISSN0266-0032

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