Elite UK winter wheat cultivars differ in their ability to support the colonisation of beneficial root-infecting fungi

A - Papers appearing in refereed journals

Osborne, S., Mcmillan, V. E., White, R. P. and Hammond-Kosack, K. E. 2018. Elite UK winter wheat cultivars differ in their ability to support the colonisation of beneficial root-infecting fungi. Journal of Experimental Botany. 69 (12), pp. 3103-3115.

AuthorsOsborne, S., Mcmillan, V. E., White, R. P. and Hammond-Kosack, K. E.
Abstract

In numerous countries, Gaeumannomyces species, within the Magnaporthaceae family, have previously been implicated in the suppression of take-all root disease in wheat. A UK arable isolate collection (n= 47) was gathered and shown to contain Gaeumannomyces hyphopodioides and an unnamed Magnaporthaceae species. A novel seedling pot bioassay revealed both species had a similar ability to colonise cereal roots, however rye (Secale cereale) was only poorly colonised by the Magnaporthaceae species. To evaluate the ability of 40 elite UK winter wheat cultivars to support soil inoculum of beneficial soil dwelling fungi, two field experiments were carried using a naturally infested arable site in south-east England. The elite cultivars grown in the first wheat situation differed in their ability to support G. hyphopodioides inoculum, measured by colonisation on Hereward as a subsequent wheat in a seedling soil core bioassay. In addition, the root colonisation ability of G. hyphopodioides was influenced by second wheat cultivar choice. Nine cultivars supported the colonisation of the beneficial root fungus. Our findings provide evidence of complex host genotype-G. hyphopodioides interactions occurring under field conditions. This new knowledge could provide an additional soil-based crop genetic management strategy, to help combat take-all root disease.

KeywordsBeneficial soil dwelling fungi; Biological control of root disease; Elite UK wheat cultivars; Gaeumannomyces hyphopodioides; Magnaporthaceae family; Phialophora species; Soil-borne fungi; Take-all disease; Triticum aestivum; Wheat germplasm
Year of Publication2018
JournalJournal of Experimental Botany
Journal citation69 (12), pp. 3103-3115
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1093/jxb/ery136
Open accessPublished as ‘gold’ (paid) open access
FunderBiotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council
Funder project or code20:20 Wheat [ISPG]
[20:20 Wheat] Protecting yield potential of wheat
Designing Future Wheat (DFW) [ISPG]
DFW - Designing Future Wheat - Work package 2 (WP2) - Added value and resilience
Publisher's version
Accepted author manuscript
Output statusPublished
Publication dates
Online10 Apr 2018
Publication process dates
Accepted12 Oct 2017
PublisherOxford University Press (OUP)
Copyright licenseCC BY
ISSN0022-0957
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