Inactivation of plant infecting fungal and viral pathogens to achieve biological containment in drainage water using UV treatment

A - Papers appearing in refereed journals

Urban, M., Motteram, J., Jing, H-C., Powers, S. J., Townsend, J. A., Devonshire, J., Pearman, I., Kanyuka, K., Franklin, J. F. and Hammond-Kosack, K. E. 2011. Inactivation of plant infecting fungal and viral pathogens to achieve biological containment in drainage water using UV treatment. Journal of Applied Microbiology. 110 (3), pp. 675-687.

AuthorsUrban, M., Motteram, J., Jing, H-C., Powers, S. J., Townsend, J. A., Devonshire, J., Pearman, I., Kanyuka, K., Franklin, J. F. and Hammond-Kosack, K. E.
Abstract

Aim: To explore whether ultraviolet (UV) light treatment within a closed circulating and filtered water drainage system can kill plant pathogenic species. Methods and Results: Ultraviolet experiments at 254 nm were conducted to determine the inactivation coefficients for seven plant pathogenic species. At 200 mJ cm-2, the individual species log reductions obtained for six Ascomycete fungi and a cereal virus were as follows: Leptosphaeria maculans (9 center dot 9-log), Leptosphaeria biglobosa (7 center dot 1-log), Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) (4 center dot 1-log), Mycosphaerella graminicola (2 center dot 9-log), Fusarium culmorum (1 center dot 2-log), Fusarium graminearum (0 center dot 6-log) and Magnaporthe oryzae (0 center dot 3-log). Dilution experiments showed that BSMV was rendered noninfectious when diluted to > 1/512. Follow-up large-scale experiments using up to 400 l of microbiologically contaminated waste water revealed that the filtration of drainage water followed by UV treatment could successfully be used to inactivate several plant pathogens. Conclusions: By combining sedimentation, filtration and UV irradiation within a closed system, plant pathogens can be successfully removed from collected drainage water. Significance and Impact of the Study: Ultraviolet irradiation is a relatively low cost, energy efficient and labour nonintensive method to decontaminate water arising from a suite of higher biological containment level laboratories and plant growth rooms where genetically modified and/or quarantine fungal and viral plant pathogenic organisms are being used for research purposes.

KeywordsBiotechnology & Applied Microbiology; Microbiology
Year of Publication2011
JournalJournal of Applied Microbiology
Journal citation110 (3), pp. 675-687
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1111/j.1365-2672.2010.04917.x
PubMed ID21226796
Open accessPublished as green open access
FunderBiotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council
Funder project or codePDM
MCB
Publisher's version
ISSN13645072
PublisherWiley

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