Inactivation of plant infecting fungal and viral pathogens to achieve biological containment in drainage water using UV treatment

A - Papers appearing in refereed journals

Urban, M., Motteram, J., Jing, H-C., Powers, S. J., Townsend, J. A., Devonshire, J., Pearman, I., Kanyuka, K., Franklin, J. F. and Hammond-Kosack, K. E. 2011. Inactivation of plant infecting fungal and viral pathogens to achieve biological containment in drainage water using UV treatment. Journal of Applied MicroBiology. 110 (3), pp. 675-687.

AuthorsUrban, M., Motteram, J., Jing, H-C., Powers, S. J., Townsend, J. A., Devonshire, J., Pearman, I., Kanyuka, K., Franklin, J. F. and Hammond-Kosack, K. E.
Abstract

Aim: To explore whether ultraviolet (UV) light treatment within a closed circulating and filtered water drainage system can kill plant pathogenic species. Methods and Results: Ultraviolet experiments at 254 nm were conducted to determine the inactivation coefficients for seven plant pathogenic species. At 200 mJ cm-2, the individual species log reductions obtained for six Ascomycete fungi and a cereal virus were as follows: Leptosphaeria maculans (9 center dot 9-log), Leptosphaeria biglobosa (7 center dot 1-log), Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) (4 center dot 1-log), Mycosphaerella graminicola (2 center dot 9-log), Fusarium culmorum (1 center dot 2-log), Fusarium graminearum (0 center dot 6-log) and Magnaporthe oryzae (0 center dot 3-log). Dilution experiments showed that BSMV was rendered noninfectious when diluted to > 1/512. Follow-up large-scale experiments using up to 400 l of microbiologically contaminated waste water revealed that the filtration of drainage water followed by UV treatment could successfully be used to inactivate several plant pathogens. Conclusions: By combining sedimentation, filtration and UV irradiation within a closed system, plant pathogens can be successfully removed from collected drainage water. Significance and Impact of the Study: Ultraviolet irradiation is a relatively low cost, energy efficient and labour nonintensive method to decontaminate water arising from a suite of higher biological containment level laboratories and plant growth rooms where genetically modified and/or quarantine fungal and viral plant pathogenic organisms are being used for research purposes.

KeywordsBiotechnology & Applied Microbiology; Microbiology
Year of Publication2011
JournalJournal of Applied MicroBiology
Journal citation110 (3), pp. 675-687
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1111/j.1365-2672.2010.04917.x
PubMed ID21226796
Open accessPublished as green open access
FunderBiotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council
Funder project or codeCentre for Sustainable Pest and Disease Management (PDM)
Centre for Mathematical and Computational Biology (MCB)
Publisher's version
ISSN13645072
1364-5072
PublisherWiley

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