Multiple abiotic stress, nitrate availability and the growth of wheat

A - Papers appearing in refereed journals

Ge, Y., Hawkesford, M. J., Rosolem, C. A., Mooney, S. J., Ashton, R. W., Evans, J. and Whalley, W. R. 2019. Multiple abiotic stress, nitrate availability and the growth of wheat . Soil & Tillage Research. 191 (August), pp. 171-184.

AuthorsGe, Y., Hawkesford, M. J., Rosolem, C. A., Mooney, S. J., Ashton, R. W., Evans, J. and Whalley, W. R.
Abstract

In the field,wheat experiences a combination of physical and nutrient stresses. There has been a tendency to study root impedance and water stress in separation and less is known about how they might interact. In this study, we investigated the effect of root impedance on the growth of three wheat varieties (Cadenza, Xi19 and Battalion) at different levels of nitrate availability, from 0–20mM nitrate, in sand culture. This model system allows soil strength to be increased while maintaining adequate water availability. In a separate pot experiment, we grew the same wheat varieties in a loamy sand where soil was allowed to dry sufficiently to both reduce water potential and increase root impedance. This pot experiment also had a range of nitrate availabilities 0–20mM nitrate. Once the seedlings were established we limited water supply to apply a matric potential of approximately −200 kPa to the roots. Soil drying increased the penetrometer resistance from approximately 300 kPa to more than 1MPa. There were differences between the two experimental systems; growth was smaller in the soil-based experiment compared to the sand culture. However, the effects of the experimental treatment, root impedance or water withholding, relative to the control were comparable. Our data confirmed that leaf elongation in Cadenza (carrying the tall Rht allele) was the most sensitive to root impedance. Leaf stunting occurred irrespective of nitrate availability. Leaf elongation in the Xi19 and Battalion (carrying the semi-dwarf Rht allele) was less sensitive to root impedance and drought than Cadenza. We suggest that the critical stress in a pot experiment where the soil was allowed to dry to approximately −200 kPa was root impedance and not water availability.

KeywordsLeaf stunting; Root impedence; Nutrient stress
Year of Publication2019
JournalSoil & Tillage Research
Journal citation191 (August), pp. 171-184
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1016/j.still.2019.04.005
Open accessPublished as ‘gold’ (paid) open access
FunderBiotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council
Funder project or codeNUCLEUS: a virtual joint centre to deliver enhanced Nitrogen Use effiCiency via an integrated soiL-plant systEms approach for the Uk & BraSil
Designing Future Wheat - WP1 - Increased efficiency and sustainability
Publisher's version
Output statusPublished
Publication dates
Online15 Apr 2019
Publication process dates
Accepted04 Apr 2019
Copyright licenseCC BY
PublisherElsevier Science Bv
ISSN0167-1987

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