Postprandial incorporation of EPA and DHA from transgenic Camelina sativa oil into blood lipids is equivalent to that from fish oil in healthy humans

A - Papers appearing in refereed journals

West, A. L., Miles, E.A., Lillycrop K. A., Han, L., Sayanova, O. V., Napier, J. A. and Calder, P. C. 2019. Postprandial incorporation of EPA and DHA from transgenic Camelina sativa oil into blood lipids is equivalent to that from fish oil in healthy humans. British Journal Of Nutrition. pp. 1-27.

AuthorsWest, A. L., Miles, E.A., Lillycrop K. A., Han, L., Sayanova, O. V., Napier, J. A. and Calder, P. C.
Abstract

Eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids are important components of cell membranes. Since humans have limited ability for EPA and DHA synthesis, these must be obtained from the diet, primarily from oily fish. Dietary EPA and DHA intakes are constrained by the size of fish stocks and by food choice. Seed oil from transgenic plants that synthesise EPA and DHA represents a potential alternative source of these fatty acids, but this has not been tested in humans. We hypothesised that incorporation of EPA and DHA into blood lipids from transgenic Camelina sativa seed oil (CSO) is equivalent to that from fish oil. Healthy men and women (18 to 30 years or 50 to 65 years) consumed 450 mg EPA plus DHA from either CSO or commercial blended fish oil (BFO) in test meals in a double blind, postprandial cross-over trial. There were no significant differences between test oils or sexes in EPA and DHA incorporation into plasma triacylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine or non-esterified fatty acids over 8 hours. There were no significant differences between test oils, age groups or sexes in postprandial VLDL, LDL or HDL sizes or concentrations. There were no significant differences between test oils in postprandial plasma TNFα, interleukin 6 or 10, or soluble intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 concentrations in younger participants. These findings show that incorporation into blood lipids of EPA and DHA consumed as CSO was equivalent to BFO and that such transgenic plant oils are a suitable dietary source of EPA and DHA in humans.

KeywordsTransgenic plant; Camelina sativa; Docosahexaenoic acid; Eicosapentaenoic acid; Postprandial
Year of Publication2019
JournalBritish Journal Of Nutrition
Journal citationpp. 1-27
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1017/S0007114519000825
Open accessPublished as green open access
FunderBiotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council
Funder project or codeCan oils derived from genetically-modified plants replace fish oil as a source of long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the human diet?
Accepted author manuscript
Output statusIn press
Publication dates
Print12 Apr 2019
PublisherCambridge University Press (CUP)
ISSN0007-1145
File

Permalink - https://repository.rothamsted.ac.uk/item/8wqyq/postprandial-incorporation-of-epa-and-dha-from-transgenic-camelina-sativa-oil-into-blood-lipids-is-equivalent-to-that-from-fish-oil-in-healthy-humans

26 total views
48 total downloads
1 views this month
5 downloads this month
Download files as zip